Moving Toward Integrated Efficiency 

Before the Hoosiers reached mass adoption, various companies came together to promote an idea of an integrated, efficient kitchen.  The following two photos from the 1906 edition of Craftsman Magazine show a view of a model kitchen.  

vintage kitchen photos, old kitchens, 19th century kitchens, kitchens 1920s
1906

Here we see one side of a model kitchen where the large sink and preparation area is set up with some basic storage above it.  During this time, the sink was typically a large porcelain monster like the one you see here.  This is why we have the phrase "Everything but the Kitchen Sink!" because it was such a heavy monstrosity.  

 

vintage kitchen photos, old kitchens, 19th century kitchens, kitchens 1920s
1906

Another image from Craftsman Magazine shows the cooking area and pot/pan storage.  This picture gives you a great sense of why the Hoosier cabinet caught on so well - it was a total bear to have all those pots and pans hanging from ceilings and shelves!

These photos also give you a sense of how there started to be a 'flow' to kitchen design.  They were only missing one thing, though:  Cabinets!